Tag: "Canada"

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U.S. Proposal to Ban Cross-Border Polar Bear Trades Denied

Since probably the dawn of time, humans have hunted animals for “useful” parts. Their meat, eaten. Their skins, used for blankets, clothing and even shelter. Their bones, at one time, were used to make useful items like utensils.

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Annual Sealing on Hay Island Called Off

In more good news for seals, the annual hunt on Hay Island off Cape Breton has been cancelled this year. According to an anti-seal organization, this was done because of the shrinking interest in seal products internationally.

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Eleven Killer Whales Trapped in Frozen Canadian Bay Freed by Mother Nature

When a hunter found eleven killer whales (orcas) trapped in Hudson’s Bay in northeastern Canada, there was little hope for their survival. With only one small hole for the pod of whales to surface, breathing room was scarce. If locals didn’t do something to create more space, it was very likely that some (or all) of the whales would die.

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Polar Bear Numbers Rise in Canada

For some years now the polar bear has been the symbol of climate change with many conservationists concerned about the melting ice home of the animal due to warming temperatures. But a new survey has put a question mark of whether the polar bear is really decreasing in numbers with the survey showing population of the bear in parts of Northern Canada higher that estimated and even growing.

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Rescued Black Bear Cub Could Be Euthanized

An abandoned black bear cub who was rescued from the side of a Manitoba highway nine days ago just can’t seem to get a break. Despite being nursed back to health by a local Rene Dubois, the cub could be euthanized by the Manitoba Conservation Department.

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Ship Noise Stresses Baleen Whales

The Baleen whales are characterized by having baleen plates for filtering food from water instead of having teeth. But it seems that while these endangered whales are able to filter food, they are not able to filter the low frequency noise created by large ships in the sea and these noises are a constant source of stress for the whales.

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Harp Seal Pups Dying at Dramatic Rate

Harp seal pups are dying off at dramatic rates in Eastern Canada. The culprit? Climate change, once again. A recent report in the science journal PLoS One revealed that disappearing seal habitat has resulted in a spike in the mortality rate of harp seal pups.

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Russia Bans Export and Import of Seal Skin

In a move that has come as a pleasant surprise for many animal activists Russia, Belarus and Kazakstan, informed the World Trade Organization that they are banning the import and export of harp seal pelts. Canada’s commercial harp seal industry will receive the biggest setback from this development.

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‘Hitchhiking’ Bear Taken To B.C. Woods After Vancouver Visit {Video}

A garbage collection employee got the surprise for his life when he discovered a bear had ‘hitchhiked’ in the back of his truck on Monday.

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Is The Beaver On The Way Out In Canada?

If a Canadian Conservative senator has her way, beavers will be replaced by polar bears in Canada shortly. No, she isn’t suggesting that polar bears should start feeding on beavers, but rather that Canada’s emblem should no longer be the beaver (which is also the country’s national animal) but instead be replaced with the polar bear.

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Bird Watching….At A Nuclear Power Plant?!

Not surprisingly, security is pretty tight at nuclear power plants around the world. But that didn’t stop an intruder from hanging out at the Darlington nuclear power plant in Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada last week. A willow ptarmigan, who lives in the Arctic regions of Northern Quebec, was discovered on the plant’s grounds by an employee. It had been over 100 years – 1897 to be exact – since a willow ptarmigan was seen in the area, so this discovery caused quite the stir in the bird watching community.

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Free As A Bird

As humans encroach more and more onto wildlife habitat, humane societies are learning to care for more than just dogs and cats. Take the Kitchener-Waterloo Human Society, for instance. Located about an hour’s drive southwest of Toronto, the human society has rehabbed and released five red-tailed hawks in the past four years alone, including two this past Thursday.