Category: Wildlife

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Scientists Confirm: Salmon Use Magnetism to Find Their Way Home

Scientists have long theorized that salmon use magnetism to find their way home, but there’s never been any evidence to prove this theory true – until now. According to scientists from Oregon State University in Corvallis, their recent study confirms that salmon really are using the Earth’s magnetic field to navigate their way home to spawn each year.

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Komodo Dragon Attacks Two in Indonesia

A day at the office for two staff members of a wildlife park in Indonesia turned dreadful when a Komodo dragon entered the office and attacked them.

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Researchers Discover the Mystery behind the Head-Turning Abilities of Owls

If you’ve ever wondered how an owl can contort its head into some of the most uncomfortable looking positions, you’re not alone; scientists and animal experts have wondered the same thing or years. Recently, they had an opportunity to find answers to this mysterious question through dissection and analysis of several owls that had died from natural causes.

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Iran Launches First Monkey into Space and Paves Way for Human Launches at Their Own Space Center

Only a handful of countries have made rocket launches into space – Iran, the United States, China, the Soviet Union, France, Japan, the United Kingdom and Israel. So far, only three have managed to send humans into space – the Soviet Union, the United States and China.

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New Park Safeguards Future of Western Lowland Gorillas

In 2008 the world was stunned by the news when Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) accidentally discovered a remote swamp forests in northern Republic of Congo contained a stunning population of 125,000 western lowland gorillas. Now, the newly created Ntokou-Pikounda National Park will finally ensure that this haven for the apes remains protected for the future.

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Rare Cats Abound At The Serengeti Park in Germany

Four white lions and four white tigers were photographed climbing over each other in their compound at Serengeti Park in Hodenhagen, Germany on Wednesday.

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Monkeys Synchronize their Actions just like Humans

How often have you matched your steps with your friend to walk at the same pace? We humans, tend to synchronise our actions with people around us many times like clapping after a concert or cheering for a team to win. Now scientists say that apes and monkeys do the same thing as well making it a common primate trait.

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Twycross Zoo Debuts New Baby Gorilla!

Exciting new for keepers at the Twycross Zoo! Staff at the primate center announced today that one of their western lowland gorilla females, Ozala welcomed a baby at approximately 9.15am on Thursday, January 3.

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Entire Gorilla Family from Kent to be Released into the Wild

While zoos do serve as an attraction for tourists, there are some zoos and organizations take pride themselves on being able to encourage re-population of endangered species in the wild. The private Kent zoo, in collaboration with the John Aspinall Foundation, is just one of them.

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Critically Endangered Black Macaque Population in Sulawesi on the Rebound

While most reports of critically endangered species continue to break the hearts of wildlife and nature enthusiasts, there is one critically endangered species in Sulawesi making a comeback! Black macaques, otherwise known as the ‘gorilla of Indonesia,’ are reportedly showing signs of recovery after experiencing a decline so devastating that experts thought they would disappear.

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Extinction of Species Not as Rapid as it is Predicted, says New Study

It is a common concern of many naturalists that a number of species may become extinct even before scientists can discover them. But a new research by a Griffith University researcher says that these concerns are highly overstated.

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Bottlenose Dolphin with Deformed Spine ‘Adopted’ by a Pod of Sperm Whales

When you think about dolphins, you probably imagine highly social animals that enjoy basking in the lime light. For the most part, you’d be right. Sperm whales, on the other hand, tend to be on the opposite end of the socialization spectrum; they’re shy, reserved, and they rarely mingle with other sea creatures.